Membership changes effective January 2019

We are changing our membership policy to make things more convenient for you!

Beginning January 2019, new HPNA memberships will be up for renewal on January 1 of each calendar year. No more remembering dates or forgetting to renew! Pay your membership dues in January and enjoy the benefits the rest of the year.
NOTE: All membership renewals paid in October, November, and December 2018 will be treated as payments for 2019 membership. We hope this change makes it easier for you to keep track of your HPNA membership. If this presents a problem for you, please contact the HPNA Treasurer at treasurer@hydeparkkc.org.
Memberships are available to anyone 18 and older who resides or has a business in Hyde Park.

Block Parties are a Great Way to Get to Know Your Neighbors

This feature originally appeared in the May/June issue of the Hyde Parker.

At the March neighborhood meeting, North Hyde Park Rep Chad Moore shared information and ideas for hosting block parties. Planning a block party with your neighbors helps you get to know the people living on your street, and a well-connected street makes for a safer neighborhood. Some Hyde Park blocks host annual parties, some invite neighbors from surrounding streets, and others keep things smaller by inviting just the neighbors on their block. If you’re interested planning a block party for your street, permit applications are available online at kcmo.gov/publicworks/permits. Applications must include the signatures of at least 60% of your block and should be submitted one month prior to the event. The HPNA Social Committee has put together some tips and other helpful information to get you started.

Visit the HPNA Blog at hydeparkkc.org/blog to find out more, or you can contact Chad Moore at northrep@hydeparkkc.org if you need more guidance in planning your event.

North Hyde Park block party!

HPNA Code of Conduct

Kansas City’s Hyde Park is a diverse neighborhood filled with neighbors of all ages, race, sexual orientation and socioeconomic standing.  The Hyde Park Neighborhood Association Board values and promotes this diversity and the conversations that are essential to develop understanding and neighborhood cohesion.  Divisive, mean and outrageous words or diatribes do nothing to promote this goal and have no place in the civil discourse required to resolve neighborhood issues.

With this goal in mind, the Board has established the following Code of Conduct that will be in place for all Board, General, Committee and ad hoc meetings.  All official newsletters, emails and social media posts will be crafted with these goals in mind. The Board will also ask the moderators and leads of the “unofficial” social media groups to apply the same Code of Conduct to the discussion that they moderate.

Hyde Park Neighborhood Association (HPNA) Code of Conduct

  • All community members should conduct themselves in a professional and civil manner.
  • All participants should treat others with  respect regardless of the other’s opinion, ethnicity, race, religion, religious  belief or non-belief, color, creed, national origin, ancestry, sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender expression, age, disability, marital status, income, homeowner status, renter status or political affiliation.
  • Participants should not engage in or threaten to engage in any physical attack on any other individual.
  • Participants should not use language that is threatening, obscene, or slanderous, including profanities, insults or other disparaging remarks or gestures directed toward other participants.
  • Participants should promote and, if necessary, enforce a safe meeting environment. If participants are disruptive or violate the Code of Conduct, other participants should demand that the offending participant conduct  themselves in a respectful and orderly manner.
  • Violators of the Code of Conduct may be asked to leave a meeting, event, or subject to removing a social media post
  • Participants should be respectful when called in for problematic language or behavior, and be open to listening and learning. They should recognize that the impact of their words may be different from their intent.
  • Participants should be constructive when addressing any problematic language or behavior, and proceed with the assumption that all participants care for one another and are open to resolving any harm their language or behavior may cause.
  • Participants should not engage in “bullying” or harassment which is generally defined as follows:
    • “Bullying” is conduct that meets all of the following criteria:
      • Is reasonably perceived as being dehumanizing, intimidating, hostile, threatening, or otherwise likely to evoke fear of physical hand or emotional distress;
      • Is directed at one or more participants;
      • Is conveyed through physical, verbal, or technological means;
      • Substantially interferes with participation opportunities, benefits, or programs of one or more participants at sponsored activities or events;
      • Adversely affects the ability to participate in or benefit from the HPNA programs or activities by placing the participant in reasonable fear of physical harm or by causing emotional distress;
    • “Harassment” is conduct that meets all of the following criteria:
      • Is reasonably perceived as being dehumanizing, Intimidating, hostile, threatening, or otherwise likely to evoke fear of physical harm or emotional distress;
      • Is directed at one or more participant;
      • Is conveyed through physical, verbal, or technological means;
      • Substantially interferes with participation opportunities, benefits, or programs of one or more HPNA sponsored activities or events;
      • Adversely affects the ability to participate in or benefit from the HPNA programs or activities because the conduct, as reasonably perceived by the participant, is so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive as to have this effect.

If you have questions or concerns about the Code of Conduct, please contact a HPNA board member.

Elaine McDermott: A Lasting Impression

This article originally appeared in the March/April issue of the Hyde Parker.

Elaine McDermott moved to 4012 Charlotte Street almost 34 years ago, and during her time in Hyde Park she made a big impact on her neighbors and the neighborhood itself. Moving to Kansas City from a small town in Iowa, Elaine says one of the first reasons she chose to get involved was to meet people. She worked on many neighborhood initiatives over the years, including serving on the HPNA Board, putting South Hyde Park on the National Historic Register, and volunteering on many of the Homes Tours. Elaine co-chaired the tour in 1989, and her own home was featured on the tour and in Star Magazine in 2002. One of Elaine’s most memorable projects was the long process of downzoning Hyde Park, which involved many city meetings and being very politically active on behalf of the neighborhood.

Elaine also worked with Neighborhood Housing Services (NHS) as a representative of South Hyde Park and later as president of the NHS board. Serving alongside neighbors and friends there, the partnership with this organization brought several beautification programs in Hyde Park. Among them were the installation of decorative urns throughout the neighborhood that we see adorned each year with colorful flowers, and the planting of hundreds of trees throughout Hyde Park. Elaine secured multiple grants to plant trees along residential streets and other areas.

Neighbors Kay Boehr and Dona Boley remember working together with Elaine on the Gillham Road Improvement Project, the plan responsible for bringing the updated playground to 41st and Kenwood and many other improvements that helped make our neighborhood and Gillham Park the shady, walkable, and family friendly area it is today. Speaking of their work together, Boehr recalls, “She was the energy that drove so many projects that made a huge difference in our neighborhood.”

Elaine is retiring this year from Kansas City Public Schools, and she will be moving to West Plaza. Her advice to neighbors interested in getting involved, “Show up and volunteer! There will always be someone who needs help, and there are always people willing to help. It’s a great way to meet your neighbors.”