Membership changes effective January 2019

We are changing our membership policy to make things more convenient for you!

Beginning January 2019, new HPNA memberships will be up for renewal on January 1 of each calendar year. No more remembering dates or forgetting to renew! Pay your membership dues in January and enjoy the benefits the rest of the year.
NOTE: All membership renewals paid in October, November, and December 2018 will be treated as payments for 2019 membership. We hope this change makes it easier for you to keep track of your HPNA membership. If this presents a problem for you, please contact the HPNA Treasurer at treasurer@hydeparkkc.org.
Memberships are available to anyone 18 and older who resides or has a business in Hyde Park.

HPNA Annual Meeting and Elections Nov. 13

Due to the Thanksgiving holiday, our annual meeting and elections will be moved up one week to Tuesday, November 13, 2018, 7pm at Central Presbyterian (3501 Campbell).

All neighbors are invited to join in on this meeting! Neighborhood Association members will vote on candidates for open board positions as well as the 2019 HPNA budget. Members must be in good standing at least 30 days prior to the meeting to participate in the vote. The proposed budget and nomination committee’s recommended slate of candidates are included for your review below.

HPNA Board Elections

The nominating committee has recommended a slate of candidates to fill the open Board positions. Nominations may also be made from the floor.

Open positions and nominating committee recommendations:

  • President
    • Recommendation: Allan Halquist
  • 2nd Vice President
    • Recommendation: Troy Batson
  • Recording Secretary
    • Recommendation: Rosalyn Wilson
  • Historian
    • Recommendation: Patrick Alley
  • North Hyde Park Representative
    • No recommendation
  • Central Hyde Park Representative
    • Recomendation: Jerry Jones
  • South Hyde Park Representatives
    • Recommendation: Chris Koch

 

Proposed 2019 HPNA Budget

Block Parties are a Great Way to Get to Know Your Neighbors

This feature originally appeared in the May/June issue of the Hyde Parker.

At the March neighborhood meeting, North Hyde Park Rep Chad Moore shared information and ideas for hosting block parties. Planning a block party with your neighbors helps you get to know the people living on your street, and a well-connected street makes for a safer neighborhood. Some Hyde Park blocks host annual parties, some invite neighbors from surrounding streets, and others keep things smaller by inviting just the neighbors on their block. If you’re interested planning a block party for your street, permit applications are available online at kcmo.gov/publicworks/permits. Applications must include the signatures of at least 60% of your block and should be submitted one month prior to the event. The HPNA Social Committee has put together some tips and other helpful information to get you started.

Visit the HPNA Blog at hydeparkkc.org/blog to find out more, or you can contact Chad Moore at northrep@hydeparkkc.org if you need more guidance in planning your event.

North Hyde Park block party!

HPNA Code of Conduct

Kansas City’s Hyde Park is a diverse neighborhood filled with neighbors of all ages, race, sexual orientation and socioeconomic standing.  The Hyde Park Neighborhood Association Board values and promotes this diversity and the conversations that are essential to develop understanding and neighborhood cohesion.  Divisive, mean and outrageous words or diatribes do nothing to promote this goal and have no place in the civil discourse required to resolve neighborhood issues.

With this goal in mind, the Board has established the following Code of Conduct that will be in place for all Board, General, Committee and ad hoc meetings.  All official newsletters, emails and social media posts will be crafted with these goals in mind. The Board will also ask the moderators and leads of the “unofficial” social media groups to apply the same Code of Conduct to the discussion that they moderate.

Hyde Park Neighborhood Association (HPNA) Code of Conduct

  • All community members should conduct themselves in a professional and civil manner.
  • All participants should treat others with  respect regardless of the other’s opinion, ethnicity, race, religion, religious  belief or non-belief, color, creed, national origin, ancestry, sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender expression, age, disability, marital status, income, homeowner status, renter status or political affiliation.
  • Participants should not engage in or threaten to engage in any physical attack on any other individual.
  • Participants should not use language that is threatening, obscene, or slanderous, including profanities, insults or other disparaging remarks or gestures directed toward other participants.
  • Participants should promote and, if necessary, enforce a safe meeting environment. If participants are disruptive or violate the Code of Conduct, other participants should demand that the offending participant conduct  themselves in a respectful and orderly manner.
  • Violators of the Code of Conduct may be asked to leave a meeting, event, or subject to removing a social media post
  • Participants should be respectful when called in for problematic language or behavior, and be open to listening and learning. They should recognize that the impact of their words may be different from their intent.
  • Participants should be constructive when addressing any problematic language or behavior, and proceed with the assumption that all participants care for one another and are open to resolving any harm their language or behavior may cause.
  • Participants should not engage in “bullying” or harassment which is generally defined as follows:
    • “Bullying” is conduct that meets all of the following criteria:
      • Is reasonably perceived as being dehumanizing, intimidating, hostile, threatening, or otherwise likely to evoke fear of physical hand or emotional distress;
      • Is directed at one or more participants;
      • Is conveyed through physical, verbal, or technological means;
      • Substantially interferes with participation opportunities, benefits, or programs of one or more participants at sponsored activities or events;
      • Adversely affects the ability to participate in or benefit from the HPNA programs or activities by placing the participant in reasonable fear of physical harm or by causing emotional distress;
    • “Harassment” is conduct that meets all of the following criteria:
      • Is reasonably perceived as being dehumanizing, Intimidating, hostile, threatening, or otherwise likely to evoke fear of physical harm or emotional distress;
      • Is directed at one or more participant;
      • Is conveyed through physical, verbal, or technological means;
      • Substantially interferes with participation opportunities, benefits, or programs of one or more HPNA sponsored activities or events;
      • Adversely affects the ability to participate in or benefit from the HPNA programs or activities because the conduct, as reasonably perceived by the participant, is so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive as to have this effect.

If you have questions or concerns about the Code of Conduct, please contact a HPNA board member.

City urges pet owners to take precautions during extreme summer weather

With temperatures rising, the city’s Animal Health & Public Safety Division encourages pet owners to keep a close eye on their ‘furry friends’ to keep them safe this summer. Animal health officers have the followings tips:

  • Keep your pet hydrated by providing it with plenty of water. Keep pets out of the sun and preferably indoors. Be careful not to over-exert them.
  • Symptoms of pet overheating include: excessive panting/difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, weakness, stupor, collapse, seizures, bloody diarrhea, vomit and body temperatures higher than 104 degrees.
  • Animals with flat faces (i.e. Pugs and Persian cats) are more susceptible to heat stroke because they cannot pant as effectively. These types of pets, along with elderly, overweight and/or sick pets, should be kept in air-conditioned settings as much as possible.
  • Do not keep pets in a parked vehicle – not only can this quickly lead to fatal heat stroke, it is illegal.
  • Give your pet a haircut to help prevent overheating. Hair should be shaved to one-inch length, but never down to the skin, as fur offers sun protection. Brushing your cat frequently can help prevent problems caused by excessive heat.

If anyone sees a pet in distress, call (816) 513-1313, the 311 Center or the non-emergency police dispatch line (816) 234-5111 and an animal health officer will be dispatched to the scene.

More information on keeping your pet safe this summer can be found on the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) website at www.aspca.org .

Media can contact Neighborhoods and Housing Services Department Communications/Community Liaison John Baccala at (816) 513-3202 or John.Baccala@kcmo.org

Traffic Calming/Complete Streets Project Updates in Hyde Park

Spring is finally here and the warmer weather means more people will be out and about: bicycle riding, walking, running, doing yard work, and playing at parks! Spring also marks project season for many long-awaited bike projects and pedestrian improvements in KCMO. These projects will not only expand KCMO’s growing bicycle network, but also provide broader benefits to our neighborhood such as: much needed traffic calming, pedestrian improvements, safer intersections, and overall improved access for bicycles and pedestrians. This blog post is brought to you by Maggie Priesmeyer Green, North Hyde Park Rep and Director of Programs at BikeWalkKC.

  • Armour Boulevard Road Diet: slated for early summer 2018 construction and late summer completion (Broadway to Paseo). It includes pedestrian improvements at intersections and crossing Armour and the City’s first protected bike lane. The link is to a news article that was published on in February 2018.
  • Bike parking ordinance: a new and improved ordinance went into effect in February, allowing anyone to complete a streamlined permit application process for $25 and no additional annual fees to install bike racks at their business/home. Previous permitting fees were $196 and required additional annual fees. BikeWalkKC’s blog shares more. 
  • Gillham Road Bike Corridor Study: the purpose of the Planning Sustainable Places project was to identify potential improvements for a bicycle corridor on Gillham Road (18th Street to Brush Creek). The City held a public meeting in January, in partnership with their consultant team and Mid-America Regional Council to gauge neighborhood input on potential bike lane designs. This project was a planning study and construction is not funded at this time. 
  • Charlotte/Holmes Complete Streets project: will provide bicycle access from E 25th Street to E 36th Street on both Charlotte Street and Holmes Streets. Currently, the city and consultant team are finalizing design options. You can access the bikeway design options online. The green circles on the map represent where neighbors and stakeholders gave positive feedback.
  • Midtown Complete Streets Plan: in addition to a Complete Streets ordinance passed in December 2017, the City and Mid-America Regional Council are working through a comprehensive Complete Streets plan for Midtown KCMO. The Midtown/Plaza Area Plan recommended further study and planning of several potential Complete Streets upgrades to improve safety, livability, and mobility including sections of: Broadway, Southwest Trafficway, 39th Street, and 43rd Street.
  • Bike Share Stations in Hyde Park:

Join us on the Hyde Park Community Bike ride on Saturday, May 12!

Helpful resources for staying up to date and becoming more involved:

 

 

Curious to learn more or chat about pedestrian and bicycle issues? Contact: Maggie Green, North Hyde Park Representative and Director of Programs at BikeWalkKC

Community Spotlight: Cornerstones of Care

This article originally appeared in the March/April 2018 issue of the Hyde Parker.

 

Cornerstones of Care partners with many organizations to support and improve the health and safety of youth and families. In 2011, Cornerstones chose the location of their midtown office so they would be in the heart of the community they serve. Their programs include services to support mental and behavioral health, free family trainings, and youth crisis intervention. One their highest priorities is placing and supporting youth in foster and adoptive homes. HPNA is grateful for the support of Cornerstones of Care in sponsoring neighborhood events and initiatives including the Pilgrim Run Children’s Dash, Ice Cream Social, and the new toddler playground in Hyde Park.

Cornerstones of Care is currently recruiting volunteers for ongoing opportunities including youth mentoring, and Reading Buddies on Wednesdays from 10-11am at their Gillis Campus near 81st and Wornall. They are also in need of donations for their foster care youth including hygiene supplies, twin-sized bedding, high chairs and strollers, bath towels, socks and underwear (especially in men’s sizes for older youth). Reach out to Kristen Zucht (816-508-3614) for information on donations, and Leah Kent (816-508-3544) for volunteer opportunities. Their midtown office is located at 300 E. 36th St. Visit cornerstonesofcare.org to learn more about their organization.

High School Options for Midtown Families

This article originally appeared in the March/April 2018 issue of the Hyde Parker.

Midtown families have many choices for high schools, including 11 public high schools and five private high schools within about three miles of Hyde Park.

Public high schools nearby include Central Academy of Excellence, offering core classes, AP classes, and a variety of electives, athletics, and extra-curricular clubs. Central Academy is the neighborhood high school for Hyde Park and enrolls everyone within their school boundaries, which includes midtown and east side neighborhoods. Two signature school choices are also public and tuition-free. Paseo Academy of Fine and Performing Arts serves grades 7-12 and offers all core classes, as well an opportunity to focus on music, dance, theater, creative writing, or visual arts. Lincoln College Preparatory Academy serves grades 6-12 in an academically rigorous environment with a focus on the International Baccalaureate Diploma, and frequently ranks among the best high schools in Missouri. Signature schools are a part of Kansas City Public Schools, enroll students living with the district boundaries, and may have limited space and admission criteria specific to the school. Enrollment at signature schools is on a first come, first served basis. These and other KCPS high schools offer students a chance to become part of the Early College Academy, where they earn high school credits and college credits attending MCC-Penn Valley classes, full-time, on their campus. Students in the program can graduate high school with an Associate’s Degree. More information on these and other signature and neighborhood schools is available at kcpublicschools.org.

 

 

There are also many public and tuition-free charter high schools nearby. Among these are Allen Village in Westport; DeLaSalle Charter and Frontier School of Excellence both located on Troost; Kauffman School, Hogan Preparatory, and University Academy to the south; Guadalupe Centers High School (formerly Alta Vista) in the Northeast, and the new Crossroads High School downtown. Charter schools also enroll students living within the boundaries of the Kansas City Public School district, and may have limited space and different admissions criteria for each school. Some schools offer priority enrollment for students residing within designated boundaries, or do not enroll new students in all grades. Each charter school has an enrollment period, and if more applications are received than spaces available, a lottery will be held. Information about these and other Missouri charter schools can be found at dese.mo.gov/quality-schools/charter-schools.

Private high school options near Hyde Park include Cristo Rey on Linwood, where students participate in a work study program, Plaza Academy on Broadway, Pembroke Hill on State Line Rd, St. Teresa’s Academy in Brookside, and Kansas City Academy further to the south.

With so many school options in Kansas City, one of the best ways to get to know your choices is to go inside and see firsthand what they have to offer. Prospective families are encouraged to call individual schools or visit their websites for info about scheduling a tour, visiting during an open house, and shadowing opportunities. Contact information for these and other Kansas City schools can be found at showmekcschools.org.